What is the future?

Just to get away from CAD issues for once… well almost.

The world of broadcast television is headed for a disruption similar to what Skype did to telephony. And it’s all about IP. For years now broadcast technology has been using more and more standard IT infrastructure. As computers have got faster and faster software has become capable of doing the jobs that once needed custom hardware. So now where are we at?

Let’s look at what a TV station does.

We take in content as streams and media files, adjust them to our standards, add branding etc. and create… a stream.

Until now this process involved cumbersome conversions of incoming media into broadcast signal formats (e.g. SDI) to do all the processing and monitoring etc. But we are seeing software products emerging that can take the incoming content as is, and produce a branded stream. That renders existing playout systems obsolete.

So what do you need to do this? Well in terms of hardware basically nothing. You can rent storage and processing power from cloud providers and deliver your stream anywhere on planet Earth. Removing a whole swathe of capital investment from the equation!

For broadcast engineers this means a gradual phasing out of in-house plant. Systems design gets a whole new focus. The hardware element moves out to the design of bulk IT plant, and the workflow aspect becomes an exercise in visualising the flow of content.

Broadcast is not the only area that will be swept up in this revolution. Audio-visual is fast moving towards IP-based systems. Again distribution and routing of AV becomes the province of IP networks. Audio is already there with systems like Dante. Video is coming on fast.

Systems design is not dead. You won’t be able to just hook everything up to a network and hope it will work faultlessly, but the design process will fork into  two-levels: function and implementation. The design of hardware will focus on providing “pipework” of the right size for the anticipated traffic. And function will be abstracted into the configuration of the network. Since the line between configuration and status is a rather blurred we could well be seeing diagrams linked live to the systems they depict and providing control, configuration and status in one go.

All a far cry from the world of patch panels.

 

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